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Reporting System

While we were gone…

A lot happened while we were down. Sunspot 1402 decided to show its strength as it crossed over the visible corona. From the start it began shooting out M class flares, and just as it was leaving it did the same. The strongest flare it released was an X5 class flare, which produced a large CME that mostly hit Earth. On top of several other C and M class flares, the magnetic field has had to work over time on certain occasions as of late.

The volcanic situation is interesting as always, with a few new candidates appearing on the scene, with a few old timers like Etna continuing on and on.

The largest earthquake we’ve seen since we’ve been gone was a 7.4 magnitude quake that struck Mexico on the 20th, following a 6.9 that struck Japan just a few days earlier, and prior to a 6.6 that struck PNG late on the 21st. The 188 day theory did not hold true, unfortunately. The idea was that there was a megaquake separated by a 7 mag quake in this pattern, since February 27, 2010. While we did have some 6 magnitude action and a 7.4, it still isn’t enough to say that this cycle held out. I think that it may be indicative of a pattern of movement roughly every 6 months or so, but rounding it down to the day, or hour, is likely to yield no real results. That’s all at present. The equinox has come, and now shall the colours of 2012 really start to come through.

– Admin

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March 23, 2012 Posted by | Seismic, Solar, Volcanic | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sunspot AR1402 returns after transit, renamed as AR1419

OLD SUNSPOT RETURNS: Sunspot AR1402, which unleashed an X2-class solar flare on Jan. 27th, has returned after a two-week transit around the far side of the sun. Two weeks of decay have greatly reduced the old active region.

The sunspot group, re-numbered AR1419 for its second apparition, is crackling with B- and C-class solar flares. These flares are minor compared to the eruptions of January.

The return of AR1402 is mainly significant for nostalgic reasons.

February 14, 2012 Posted by | Solar | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sunspot AR1416 Poses Threat for Earth-directed M-class flares

For the second day in a row, sunspot AR1416 has doubled in size. It has developed a beta-gamma magnetic field that harbors energy for M-class solar flares. Any such eruptions this weekend would be Earth directed as the sunspot turns to face our planet.

Click here to see the sunspot growth. (Space Weather)

Region 11416 [S18E11] developed further forming large penumbrae in the leading and trailing spot sections.

Spot Count: 17 (^9)

Area Size: 100 (^10)

February 11, 2012 Posted by | Solar | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Sunspot Region 1402 Unleashes X2 Class Flare, Not Earth-Directed

X-FLARE: Departing sunspot 1402 unleashed an X2-class solar flare on Jan. 27th at 18:37 UT. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded the extreme ultraviolet flash.

Sunspot 1402 is rotating onto the far side of the sun, so the blast site was not facing Earth. Nevertheless, energetic protons accelerated by the blast are now surrounding our planet, and an S2-class radiation storm is in progress.

The explosion also produced a spectacular coronal mass ejection (CME). A movie from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory shows the cloud raced away from the sun at 2500 km/s or 5.6 million mph. Update: Work by analysts at the Goddard Space Weather Lab shows that the CME will just miss Earth when its edge passes by our planet on Jan. 30-31.

January 28, 2012 Posted by | Radiation, Solar, Space | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Geomagnetic Storm Brings Amazing Show of Aurora Borealis

Northern Lapland, Finland. Credit: Andy Keen

STORM RECAP: As expected, a CME hit Earth’s magnetic field on Jan. 24th at approximately 1500 UT (10 am EST). The impact produced a G1-class geomagnetic storm and bright auroras around the Arctic Circle.

Even veteran aurora watchers were impressed. “This was one of the best displays that I’ve ever seen, and I mean ever in over 5000 hours on the ice,” says Andy Keen of Finland. “It was, in short, truly spectacular and something that will live with me for a lifetime.” In the Abisko National Park of Sweden, aurora tour guide Chad Blakely contributed a similar report: “Eight tourists and I were treated to one of the most wonderful displays I have ever seen. The auroras began as we were eating dinner and continued into the very early hours of the morning. Words can not describe the excitement we shared.”

The storm subsided as it crossed the Atlantic and petered out almost completely by the time it reached North America.  Aurora alerts: textvoice.

…(Space Weather)

SUBSIDING STORM: A geomagnetic storm caused by Monday’s M9-class solar flare and Tuesday’s CME impact is over. The aurora watch is cancelled for all but the higher latitudes around the Arctic Circle.

The geomagnetic field was quiet to major storm on January 24.

Solar wind speed ranged between 347 and 732 km/s. A strong solar wind shock was observed at SOHO at 14:34 UTC, the arrival of the CMEs observed early on January 23. The geomagnetic disturbance peaked 17-20h UTC when the planetary A index reached 80. The radiation storm peaked at the arrival of the CMEs with the above 10 MeV proton flux reaching a high of 6310 pfu, the strongest radiation event since 2003.

…(Solen.info)

January 25, 2012 Posted by | Radiation, Solar | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment