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Seismic swarm at San Salvador volcano alarms authorities

Authorities today ruled El Salvador declare an emergency for low-magnitude earthquakes that have shaken the Salvadoran capital, all centered in the San Salvador volcano, eight of them felt by the population and the strongest of 3.3 degrees on the Richter scale.

“There is no evidence that we are facing a potential emergency,” said Minister of Environment and Natural Resources, Herman Rosa Chavez, in a press conference in which he reiterated that no volcanic tremor, but tectonic.

“We did analysis of temperature in the area and there is no evidence that this is associated with volcanic activity, this has to do with the activation of local faults, which is something that happens and has happened before,” he said.

The eight tremors felt by the population have reached levels of between 2.2 and 3.3 degrees on the Richter scale, according to the National Service of Territorial Studies (SNET), which has recorded at least 25 microearthquakes.

The first quake was felt that reached 2.6 degrees and was registered at 01.22 local time (7.22 GMT), and most recently, of 2.7 degrees, at 15.50 (21.50 GMT).

The strongest earthquake of 3.3 degrees, occurred at 08.01 (14.01 GMT), said the SNET.

He added that the focal depth of earthquakes has fluctuated between 0.5 and 5.8 kilometers, so they felt in various parts of the city, near which is the San Salvador volcano, which is inactive.

Likewise, the eight earthquakes have reached an intensity of two on the Mercalli scale, whose maximum is 12, in San Salvador.

The Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources in a statement recalled that the last seismic swarm with epicenter in the San Salvador volcano was in 2007 when there were 142 microearthquakes, four of them felt by the population.

Apart from the string of earthquakes in San Salvador, today reported another quake Snet of 4.3 on the Richter scale at 11.26 local time (17.26 GMT) in Pacific Ocean, about 43 kilometers south of the estuary San Diego, in the department of La Libertad (center).

…(Univision)

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March 23, 2012 Posted by | Seismic, Violence | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

6.5 Magnitude EQ – Solomon Islands, 6.0 EQ – Near the East Coast of Honshu

At approximately 08:19:58 UTC on Tuesday, February 14th, a 6.5 magnitude earthquake based on water struck at a depth of 54.7 km (34.0 miles) in the region of the Solomon Islands, 72 km (44 miles) W of Kira Kira, Solomon Islands. Coords: 10.387°S, 161.262°E

…(USGS)

As well, a 6.0 Magnitude EQ struck near the East Coast of Honshu at 06:21:58, 93 km (57 miles) ESE of Mito, Honshu, Japan, at a depth of 10km (6.2 miles)… (USGS)

A powerful earthquake rocked eastern Japan Tuesday, but no tsunami warning was issued and no damage was reported at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant.

The US Geological Survey said the 6.0 magnitude quake, with an epicentre 10 kilometres (six miles) deep, was centred 166 kilometres east-northeast of Tokyo, where correspondents said buildings swayed.

Japan’s meteorological agency also located the quake off the coast of Ibaraki prefecture, south of the stricken plant. A very small change of tidal level was forecast but was not expected to cause any damage. Nuclear plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) said the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant remained stable.

…(Vancouver Sun)

February 14, 2012 Posted by | Seismic | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Earthquakes of 2011 – Visual

February 11, 2012 Posted by | Seismic | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Haiti Could Be in a New Earthquake Cycle, Scientists Say

The magnitude-7.0 earthquake that shook Port-au-Prince, Haiti, two years ago nearly demolished the city and took both residents and geologists by surprise.

Now, a team of scientists thinks they’ve identified a centuries-long pattern of earthquakes on the island of Hispaniola, which comprises both Haiti and the Dominican Republic, that could portend earthquakes to come.

Although past seismic activity can’t be used to predict future quakes, the findings may help residents and those hoping to rebuild Port-au-Prince prepare for the next big one, said William Bakun, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif.

“People shouldn’t be surprised if, in the decades to come, there are more very damaging earthquakes in the region,” Bakun told OurAmazingPlanet, “and they should plan and build accordingly.”

A very detailed record
Bakun and his colleagues gathered historical records — letters, drawings, newspaper clippings and more — from residents of Hispaniola since the time that Christopher Columbus dropped anchor at the island. From descriptions of shaking and damage, Bakun was able to estimate the intensities, magnitudes and locations of historical earthquakes.

“It was in the interests of the Spanish colonies to report all damage back to the king,” Bakun explained, “because he was in the habit of supplying them funds to rebuild critical facilities, cathedrals and the like. So there are actually very detailed records of Hispaniola’s earthquakes.”

…(MSNBC)

January 28, 2012 Posted by | Seismic | , , , , , , | 1 Comment